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A Self-Care Plan to Cultivate Calm

A Self-Care Plan to Cultivate Calm

Teena Evert, MA, LMFT, LAC, PC is an intuitive therapist and coach who specializes in helping her clients achieve transformation in their lives both personally and professionally. She is of great help to busy professionals on a quest to have it all: life satisfaction, a meaningful career, sane work/life balance, and healthy relationships.

Teena encourages you to develop your own unique self-care plan and give yourself the gift of deeply caring for and loving yourself, so you can thrive in a forever changing world.

 

Feeling stressed out?

Everyone experiences stress in life, and as a Life and Career Coach, many of my clients come to me wondering how to better manage it. We actually need stress in order to thrive and continue to actualize as human beings. We also need to be okay with getting out of our own comfort zone so we can learn to thrive in a forever changing world.

The problem with stress is that we can often get stuck in a chronic state of stress that doesn’t allow us to thrive. When we are under too much stress for too long we are living in a state of survival that is headed down a path of self-destruction.

When we can manage the stress in our lives on a regular daily basis we learn to reset our nervous system back to a healthy baseline of rest and relaxation. Rest and relaxation is part of our natural state of being, without it we go into overdrive and lose touch with caring for ourselves, those we love, and the planet.

A self-care checklist is an excellent first step in bringing awareness to how you manage the stress in your life. Notice the areas of your life that need extra attention and begin to develop your own self-care plan.

Physical

_I get adequate sleep every night

_I eat healthy meals regularly

_I drink lots of water throughout the day

_I walk or exercise at least 3 times per week

Relationships

_I keep focused on how I can be more loving and kind with people in my life

_I share appreciation with those I love – friends and family throughout the day

_I am open to resolving conflict in a healthy loving way

_I am able to speak my truth and set loving boundaries with others

Fun and Relaxation

_I have fun on a regular basis

_I laugh freely and easily

_I take breaks for fun and relaxation – I don’t work non-stop

_I have things planned in the future that I look forward to

Physical Environment

_My home is well organized and clean

_I live in a home that I love

_My work environment is well organized and inspiring

_I love my lifestyle – the way I live my life

Emotional Health

_I feel peaceful and happy in my life

_I am pursuing my dreams and living my purpose

_I know my own intrinsic worth and feel loved

_I feel my life has balance and I have plenty of time to do all that I want to do

Spirituality

_I know that I am a spiritual being living in a human body

_I feel a deep connection with my spiritual connection

_I have activities I do on a regular basis that nurture my spiritual life

_I have faith that my life is unfolding exactly as it should for my highest good

Learning how to manage stress in your life is an essential part of skillful living and life satisfaction. It takes practice to know what works best on a regular daily basis. A self-care plan also needs to have some flexibility and adaptability, as it will change throughout the different stages in life, as well as with the seasons of nature.

What’s on your self-care checklist? Share with us below in the comments section.

Wishing you all the best,
Teena

 

Happiness, Self Improvement / Personal Growth, Success, Teena Evert, Uncategorized

A Self-Care Plan to Cultivate Calm

You plan your day, meetings, outings, grocery list, and events - but are you taking the time to plan your self-care? We are all busy, but forgetting to take care of yourself is a sure-fire way to burnout and neglect your personal health. Here is a self-care checklist from a therapist and life coach who understands wanting to "balance it all." Read More
Dr. Lisa Marie Bobby, Happiness, Podcast, Success

How To Stay Motivated

Do you know what you need to do... but then don't do it?
Here's some free advice from a Life Coach: Setting goals and making plans are necessary to achieve your dreams. But your success will ultimately hinge upon your ability to do what you know you need to do consistently. And -- here's the hard part -- even when you don't feel like it.
One of the biggest things the Life Coaches do, as a matter of fact, is help people stay motivated. Having an accountability partner, and someone expecting you to do your homework rallies your motivation. Something about doing things "just for yourself" leaves you vulnerable to the opposite of motivation -- which is being comfy, and indulging instant gratification. (Trust me, I know -- it happens to me too).Read More... Read More
how to stay motivated denver life coach denver therapist

How to Balance Your Career and Relationship

How to Balance Your Career and Relationship

Rachel Harder, M.A., LMFT-C is a positive, solution-focused “change agent” with a fun, empowering approach to personal growth and couples therapy. Rachel helps couples achieve a more balanced life both in their personal and professional lives.

Working it out

As a relationship counselor and life coach, I have had the opportunity to work with couples who both value their career and their relationship, yet do not know how to properly balance the two. Understanding this work/life balance is essential for not only individuals looking to cultivate a happier life, but especially for couples in long-term committed relationships.

For many of us, we become aware of how off balance our priorities are in unexpected moments. For me, I was typing furiously on my computer one evening, multi-tasking (or more attempting to multi-task). I was trying to carry on a conversation with my partner and tie up loose ends from the work-day when my partner said, “Work isn’t our whole lives.” I often revisit his words during moments of overwhelming stress or when I struggle to find balance. This little statement took me by surprise. Mainly, because this really hadn’t occurred to me.

I’d spent years in school to foster a career I could be proud of. In fact, many components of my life have revolved around the idea of creating success. In living this way, I had fallen into the trap of working long hours and forgetting to devote quality time to my other values. I was treating work like it was my whole life.

Now perhaps you’ve had a moment like this, where you’ve noticed you derive a sense of worth, value, or even freedom by focusing on your career. Perhaps, you’ve done this at what might feel like a cost (your social life, time with loved ones, less time doing hobbies, etc.).

What if I told you that you didn’t have to pick between a successful career or successful relationships?  In working with clients (and based on personal experience), I’ve found a few tips to be very helpful in creating balance.

Take Stock of Where You Spend Your Time

Dr. John and Julie Gottman describe this conundrum (balancing work and relationships) as a “simple” numbers game. If you and your partner both work 60-70 hours per week, this means there are simply fewer hours available to devote to your relationships. In these situations, they recommend maximizing the time you do have together (make that 10-minute break count) and to also evaluate what is sustainable for your relationship, long-term.

Crunch the Numbers!

Look at how much time you and your partner actually have together and discuss if this will be workable over the long haul. If the answer is no, this is an opportunity to really evaluate your goals as a couple (which I’ll talk more about next).

In the meantime, establish routines and rituals that allow for you to create meaning with the limited amount of time you do have together. For example, if you have 10 minutes together before heading to work, try putting your phones away and take the first few sips of your morning coffee together.

Identify What’s Truly Important

Certainly, it’s positive to derive satisfaction from your work, but what are your priorities in the “big picture?” Typically, most people don’t wish they’d spent more hours at the office…but we do often remember and, maybe even regret, the missed moments with loved ones or doing the things we love.

So, what’s important to you and your relationship? Take a moment to write out a list and prioritize it according to what YOU feel is best and then discuss it with your partner. How do your priorities line up? Are there opportunities for growth both in your personal priorities and the priorities of your relationship?

Discuss With Your Partner Your Long-term Goals & Values


Talk openly about what you have in common (and what you don’t have in common). From there, you can identify ways to support one another as well as longer-term plans that will allow both you, your partner (AND your relationship) to have their respective needs met.

Often our relationship to work is rooted in what our work represents to us. For some it might symbolize a paycheck, a means to an end. For others, it might represent self-worth and validation. Understanding what work means to you will be a critical component in not only communicating with your partner or loved ones but also better understanding yourself.

Find Other Outlets That Assist You With the Same Goal


What I mean by this is, if you rely on work as your primary outlet to feel validated or accomplished, it may be helpful to find other avenues that meet these same needs. In doing this, you will have more flexibility to set healthy boundaries around work and you won’t need to rely so heavily on work in and of itself. Put bluntly, you’ll start feeling better!

My hope for you is that in evaluating these different pieces, you’re able to put your career into context (what’s the big picture and what matters most to you?). In doing this, it doesn’t mean that you value your job any less but instead, you may find you’re able to let go of unnecessary pressure and devote time to the relationships you truly value.

To sum it all up, by fostering open communication with your loved ones and by being clear in your values and goals, you certainly can have a satisfying career and satisfying relationships. You might even be able to find that tricky “balance” everyone is talking about.

Wishing you success,
Rachel Harder, M.A., LMFTC

A Self-Care Plan to Cultivate Calm

You plan your day, meetings, outings, grocery list, and events - but are you taking the time to plan your self-care? We are all busy, but forgetting to take care of yourself is a sure-fire way to burnout and neglect your personal health. Here is a self-care checklist from a therapist and life coach who understands wanting to "balance it all." Read More

Advice From a Career Coach: 5 Ways to Win at Work

Advice From a Career Coach: 5 Ways to Win at Work

What will really get you ahead in your career may surprise you…

Career coaching is a billion dollar business for a reason: How good you feel about your professional life is extremely important. You’ll spend more of your waking hours on the job than doing anything else. Feeling fulfilled, happy, and like you’re getting ahead in a career you love is essential.

But there are so many things that can throw you off track professionally: Difficult working relationships, problematic communication, constant stress about getting things done, or feeling emotionally disengaged from your work can all drag you down. It can start to feel hard to get out of bed on Monday mornings. You might even start to question your career choice, and fantasize about chucking it all and starting over. (Listen: “What to do if you hate your job?“)

If you’ve been feeling “meh” about your job lately, here’s some free advice from a career coach to help you get your mojo back and start turning things around.

  • Be Positive: As I recently discussed with Mic.com’s “Payoff,” (read “Smart brain hacks to help you feel and project more positivity at work”) few things are more important to your professional success than your attitude. When you’re focused on opportunity, solutions, and possibilities — as opposed to problems, criticisms, and obstacles — you’ll not just feel happier, but shine professionally. Projecting positivity to others enhances their perceptions of your competence, adds value to your contributions, and enhances your authority as a leader.

 

  • Prioritize Relationships: When it comes to being truly successful, the actual work you do doesn’t matter nearly as much as your ability to form positive working relationships with your colleagues, bosses, customers and subordinates. While you should certainly strive to perform your job to the best of your ability, never do so at the expense of the people around you. Even the most incandescently talented or supernaturally productive workers will be let go eventually if everyone else hates working with them.

 

  • Set Boundaries: Many people struggle to function and complete day to day tasks in work environments that interfere with their ability to focus, and manage their time. In the era of open floor plans and constant SMS pings from coworkers, it’s essential to set boundaries with others to protect your time, and your attention. Furthermore, you may need to set boundaries with yourself so that can prioritize effectively, stay on task, and get things done. Even more importantly, you may need to create boundaries around your non-working hours in order to create healthy work / life balance.

 

  • Find Meaning: No matter how great your work environment is, and how well you’re doing in your career, you’ll still feel hollow if your professional life lacks meaning and purpose. For some people, it’s important that the actual work they do is linked to their values. For others, their meaning is found not through the work itself but in the life and relationships that their work supports.  What’s your “why?” Make sure you know, so that you can stay connected with your higher purpose as you move through your work day.

 

  • Cultivate Emotional Intelligence: Research consistently shows that the most successful, high achieving people are the ones with the highest emotional intelligence. Too often our education and professional experience trains us to perform tasks and solve problems, and neglects teaching us the “soft skills” that matter most. Your ability to manage your emotions in stressful situations, to keep your own anxieties and insecurities at bay, to communicate effectively, and to be sensitive to the feelings of others is what matters most when you’re on the job.

 

Now, back to work! 🙂

xoxo, Dr. Lisa Marie Bobby

 

Start The New Year STRONG

Start The New Year STRONG

Free advice from a Denver Life Coach:

Did you know that making New Year’s resolutions can actually get in the way of your making real and lasting change in your life?

Today on the Love, Happiness and Success Podcast I’m putting on my Life Coach hat: I’m going to teach you a totally different way of thinking about “success” that will help you clarify your values, focus your energy on what’s really important, and help you make massive progress towards the things you want most in life this coming year.

Sounds bold, I know, but this is a system I use all the time with great results — both with my clients, and myself. Today I’m going to be teaching it to you, too. (Psst. Have you subscribed to the Love, Happiness and Success Podcast yet? Subscribe to get the latest episodes in your feed, and while you’re there leave a review!)

New Year’s Resolutions Don’t Work

I felt compelled to share this to you because I know that you — like all of us — probably have high hopes for the coming year. And there’s nothing worse than making big plans for change… only to feel like a “failure” before February even rears it’s heart-spangled self.

What we know from research (click here to review the Stanford study on New Year’s resolutions) is that only 8% of Americans achieve their New Years resolutions. Pretty grim. That’s 92% of people feeling like they missed the mark.

So What Will Actually Help You Achieve Your Goals?

In order to understand what will work, we have to first understand what traditional New Year’s resolutions are lacking, and why they fizzle fast.

It’s because even the most heartfelt resolutions are often disconnected from the things that will get you real results: Your values, your time, and your energy. It’s one thing to set a goal. Goals are great, and give us a direction to move towards. But making things happen in your life is altogether different than “achieving goals.” To hike up the tallest mountain, you have to stay on the path. The right path. If your only focus is the mountain peak, it’s pretty easy to wander off into the bushes that are right in front of you.

[Tweet “Remember: Success isn’t an event. It’s a lifestyle.”]

Here’s A Simple System That Will Move You Forward, Meaningfully.

This podcast is a New Year’s gift to you. I’ll be teaching you the system I use, and that I use with many of my clients to help them refocus, recenter, and kindle a motivational fire under them. It will help you not just start the New Year off on the right foot, but help you get on the right path for the long haul.

And – FYI – If you happen to be reading this AFTER the New Year, that is great too. This approach is a life-skill that you can use any time of the year to get re-focused, re-centered, and re-energized. Walk through the activities any time you’re feeling like you need to get back on track.

Because I’m all about making things easy and effective I even made you a worksheet so that you can work along with me during the podcast, and do the activities I’ll be walking you through. Just tell me where to send it.

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Start The New Year STRONG

by Dr. Lisa Marie Bobby | Love, Happiness & Success

Music Credits: “New Year” by Beach House

Subscribe to the Love, Happiness & Success Podcast on iTunes & Stitcher. Please rate and review if you enjoy the Podcast!

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Have Less Frazzle and More Fun This Holiday

Have Less Frazzle and More Fun This Holiday

Have Less Frazzle and More Fun This Holiday

Holidays. The annual, breathless whirl of go-go socializing, shopping, cooking, decorating, wrapping — all building up to the gleeful spree of giving and receiving. It’s the time of year when we come together, and try to make special, memorable moments with the most cherished people in our lives.

For many of us, it’s the most important time of the year. Special outfits are bought. Pictures are taken. Gatherings are organized. People are paying huge amounts of money to fly to and from Denver through precarious weather, just to be together for those few days. We can feel a lot of pressure to make it special. I’ve been certainly hearing about the impact of this intensity in my recent life coaching sessions.

In trying to make our holiday memorable we often wind up focusing on The Stuff of the holidays. And I’m not just talking about presents. I’m talking about all the other Stuff: Wreaths. Tinsel. Sequined sweaters. Lights. Trees. Cookies. Handmade ornaments. Homemade peanut brittle. Centerpieces. Food. Wrapping paper. You know: The Stuff.

It’s hard not to get excited about The Stuff when Pinterest-inspired visions of sugarplums are dancing in your head. And the fact is that having special holiday Stuff is part of what makes this time of year so memorable and festive festive. It feels happy to look at twinkly lights, and to listen to holiday music, and decorate the tree together with people you love.

But notice as I just called your attention to happy parts of the holidays I was not talking about The Stuff itself, but the experiences you had with The Stuff.

And that’s the important part, and the true secret to having a happy holiday:

Focus on having happy experiences, not on The Stuff.

At the end of the day, no one remembers The Stuff. No one is going to remember the peanut brittle you’re killing yourself to make, nor will they think back about your awe inspiring decor or feel grateful for how many hours you sat by yourself painstakingly hand-painting ornaments. It’s only value of The Stuff is as an attractive background to happy experiences.

Here’s what really makes memories: Memories are seared into our brains through emotionally heightened experiences, and through novelty. So if you really want the legacy of your holiday efforts to be that of happy memories, put the glue gun down, abandon the idea that you’re going to make 36 hand painted tins in which to gift your brittle. Instead, start thinking about something genuinely fun you can do with your family that you will all enjoy. (Including you).

The details don’t matter. What matters is that you have a good time, and do something memorable together. So go ice skating. Have a snowball fight. Go caroling, or volunteer. The more energy you put into these activities, and the less you put into stuff, the more fun and less frazzling your holidays will be.

Tips to have genuinely happy experiences:

1) Smile. When you smile you will feel happier, and other people will feel happier. Lift up the corners of your mouth and whatever is happening will start to rise like bubbles in champagne.

2) Decide in advance that you’re going to have a good time. What will you need to be telling yourself in order to have fun? “Wow, this is great.” Decide in advance to feel grateful and appreciative of whatever experience you have, and then it shall be so.

3) Prioritize making other people feel happy and loved above all else. This will automatically make you feel happy too, if you are following rule #2 above: Decide how great it’s going to feel to bring joy to others. Give lots of hugs, tell people how terrific you think they are and smile at them a lot– no Stuff will make them feel any happier.

4) Do something different. Novelty adds interest and excitement to the most banal of experiences. So try doing something that you’ve never done before this year. Go to a hot springs, go somewhere on a train, try going down the sledding hill upside down and backwards. Go big or go small, but do something new.

5) Find ways to incorporate meaning in your holiday traditions through rituals. Mark the passing of time with letting kids make sloppy, crooked new ornaments every year. Take a new family photo every year in your shocking Christmas sweaters. Have a solstice ritual where everyone gets to say what they’re releasing into the darkness and what they’re embracing in the new light.

Be happy this holiday. Remember it’s not about The Stuff, it’s about having fun with people you love. So stop wrapping things and start wrapping people up in big hugs. You all deserve it.

Xo, Lisa

Growing Self Counseling & Coaching
Growing Self
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