Woman sitting down next to a radiator. Are you addicted to a toxic relationship?

Are You Addicted to a Toxic Relationship?

Does your relationship feel like a roller-coaster of euphoria, pain, frustration, and bliss? Do you crave connection with your beloved, only to be disappointed, rejected or hurt over and over? If so, you may be addicted to a toxic relationship. I want you to know: you are not alone, and there is a path out. As a divorce counseling expert who has helped individuals heal from a broken heart after leaving a toxic relationship, I share this story in hopes that you won’t wait as long as Tom did to find your way back to true love.

Toxic Relationship Addiction: A Case Study

A year before he died, I sat with Tom in my therapy office as he continued to obsess over Sarah. He’d left his wife and children for her several years previously. Their affair had sparked a passion deep inside him, like nothing he’d ever known. They had fun together. They laughed. Their sexual connection was intense. As destructive and crushing as the relationship had been for him, he was still addicted to the way she made him feel.

Sarah was pretty but mercurial. She would get upset and break up with him frequently, for reasons that mystified him. Even during the good times, he disapproved of her manipulative parenting, and he hated her free-spending ways. His friends disliked her. His daughters hated her. But he stayed by her side even as she was convicted of shoplifting. At least, until another fight left him alone in a restaurant after she walked out on him… again. Tom’s face got red as he talked about his frustrations, but his brown eyes welled up with tears at the thought of being without her.

During the break-ups he and I weathered together, he couldn’t bear to erase her number, delete her from Facebook, or block her email. The idea of being Capital-D Done and cutting the electronic cords filled him with fear. If he cut her off completely, he wouldn’t get the inevitable “thinking of you” text that would flood him with the hope of being back in her arms for another few months of bliss.

But the actual experience of being with Sarah was much more difficult than his idealized daydreams of her. While Tom lived for their intoxicating “peak moments,” you can only spend so much time riding a motorcycle, cresting waves of sexual ecstasy, or dancing at a concert. Sooner or later someone has to pay the tab, take out the trash, and decide what to cook the kids for dinner. That’s when the inevitable friction would start. Harsh sparks of judgment from a clash of values would quickly flare into anger and incinerate the good feelings that were the basis of the relationship. When things got, hard Sarah would again reject Tom and refuse his calls, leaving him slumped miserably on my couch, pining for her. During these times he couldn’t eat. He couldn’t sleep. He started smoking again.

We talked about the addictive nature of this relationship, and Tom could understand it intellectually when I said things like, “Doing cocaine is lots of fun too, but just because it feels good doesn’t mean it’s good for you.” He could see the parallels. But he was simply hooked. He felt euphoric when they were together. He felt a craving for her when they were apart. The fact that this relationship was the relational equivalent to eating ice cream for breakfast, lunch, and dinner didn’t matter. He just wanted to feel it again. And so it is with all addictions.

The Nature of Addiction

Here is the definition of an addiction:

1) [Insert name of vice here] changes your mood.

2) Engaging in __________  stimulates your reward system.

3) __________ causes negative consequences for your life.

4) Despite being aware of the negative consequences, you can’t stop.

The alcoholic drinks to change his mood: to celebrate, to console, to unwind, and to feel free and loose. The gambler pulls the handle to feel the surge of excitement, and the intermittent thrill of victory. The lover desires to be with their irreplaceable other for the joy of connection with their beloved. All these pleasures powerfully stimulate a neurological reward center deep in your brain that floods you with feelings of euphoria. This part of your brain, evolutionarily speaking, precedes the development of parts responsible for executive functions, language, and thought. It seems that we descended from animals who were built to crave pleasure.

This physiological engine of addiction drives our compulsions for “more.” It overrides pain, fear, and values. It can motivate pigeons to peck for reward-laden pellets until they drop from exhaustion, and shivering skeletal addicts to exchange the last remnant of their human dignity to experience it again.

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Addicted to Love

In groundbreaking research, evolutionary anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher (www.helenfisher.com) identified subjects who reported being in love and collected MRI data of their brains. Sure enough, she found that when people were exposed to images of their beloved their reward centers lit up with pleasure. Her research suggests that romantic love stimulates the same addictive neurological pathway as opiates and amphetamines. We crave love.

When you consider that above all else (from an evolutionary perspective) the survival of our species has required us to pair-bond, reproduce, and remain committed enough to successfully raise babies together, having physiological brain structures that support “addiction” to intense feelings of love make perfect sense. Taking pleasure in proximity, and having an irrational devotion to an irreplaceable other that overrides pain, fear, and logical thought is necessary if we view the power of love in the context of survival.

Think of an exhausted man carrying a limp deer home through thigh-high snow to feed the vulnerable woman and children waiting for him. Without the bonds that connect them to each other, what else would motivate him to keep going through so much danger and pain? Without the original craving for one specific person, people wouldn’t stick together long enough to form those attachments — the deeper bond that remains after romantic love fades.

One interesting theory is that this pair-bonding process was the original function of the brain’s reward system. More modern addictive substances and diversions may actually be hijacking the ancient highway of pleasure-craving that romantic love has ridden on since the beginning of time. While our pleasure system can be recruited for the pursuit of dark obsessions, it’s true purpose may be to drive us towards the pleasure we experience when we’re with our irreplaceable other. It’s there to drive us towards the attachment that sustains marriages, families, and enduring partnerships that create an ideal society. It’s there to push us towards true love: the most powerful, most positive, and most noble of all human experiences.

Toxic Relationships

Unless, of course, you fall in love with (“get addicted to”) the wrong person: someone who rejects you, who is not compatible with you, or who’s personality / values / judgment you’d find off-putting were it not for the surge of endorphins you feel in their presence. Even if you know in your head that the relationship is wrong, when you’re separated from your beloved your reward center still craves closeness with them. When you’re cut off from your irreplaceable other, the obsessions start and the compulsion to connect with them can be overpowering.

Sadly, this is what happened to Tom. Of all the “love addicts” I’ve worked with, his preoccupation with Sarah was probably the most toxic. Certainly the most tragic. We circled the cycle together many times: Rejection, Obsession and Craving, Reunion, Honeymoon, Frustration, Rejection. And each time, through our work together, the threads binding him to her stretched thinner as his awareness of his unhealthy dependence grew. But for Tom, clarity about Sarah and freedom from his addiction came late.

He started losing weight and complaining of odd pains in his stomach and by the time he finally went to the doctor he had late-stage pancreatic cancer, with a dismal chance of survival. Sarah accompanied him to one doctor’s appointment and then bailed for good, saying that “she just couldn’t stand to see him like this.” Clearly, the thrill was gone. She abandoned him to face the procedures, the chemo, the surgery, and the recovery alone.

The Difference Between Toxic Love Addiction and True Love

Only then did Tom really understand the truth of his addiction for the hollow reality it was: the pursuit of fleeting feelings. He’d left his marriage to dance in a mirage of excitement that crumbled to dust in his hands when he reached out for real support. Like Coleridge waking from his fever-dream about a pleasure-dome, Tom finally came to his senses only to find that he was alone in a desert without the True Love of attachment and commitment — from Sarah, at least.

And so he went home.

Because thankfully for him, the True Love of his ex-wife and children had endured the years of his obsessive intoxication. Their True Love, the unbreakable bond of a merciful family, was the nourishing, stable connection of support that was there for Tom at the end of his life.

In his final days, Tom was finally healed of his addiction. He found forgiveness and redemption when he came to understand and appreciate what True Love really is: the quiet, unselfish service to the wellbeing of another that endures long after the sparkles of romantic love fade.

True Love is not always fun or exciting. It’s not terribly addictive. But it is there at 3am to mop up vomit and to shelter you when you have nowhere else to go. It’s the kind of Love that has the courage to walk beside you into death and maybe even meet you again on the other side.

True Love is never an addiction because it’s not actually a feeling at all — but a choice.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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119 Comments

  1. how do I stop wanting to go back to a man who only ends up putting me down
    He blames me now for the break up saying we are not a couple

    1. Hi Judy,
      This is such a hard situation when you’re emotionally attached to someone who is not treating you well. That’s the common theme for many Exaholics — knowing intellectually that they need to move on but really not being able to. Relationships are addictive. By treating this attachment to a person the way you’d treat any other unwanted “attachment” (i.e., “addiction”) you will finally be able to recover and move on. You may consider checking out my book: “Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to An Ex Love” for more tips and insight. In the meantime, please be gentle and compassionate with yourself during this exquisitely painful process. All the best, Lisa

      1. It´s an addiction, just like alkohol or other things that make you sick.

        throw the bottle away! Close the door, and keep it closed.
        Don´t look at his number in whatsap to see if he´s online, don´t look at his facebook-profil.

        We don´t need drama, there is plenty in the world, we don´t need any more.
        But for sure, we don´t need someone, who doesn´t make us feel good.
        Love should lift us up, anything else is toxic.

  2. how do i stop loving someone who doesn’t love me the same way back they say im special to them and their best friend. but being her friend is killing me in the inside. i cry at times. but she always tells me its not gnna happen but i dont wanna lose her, i have cut her off to try and just leave that part of my life in the past but i end up worse mentally. and now im scared to talk to any one …

    1. Angel — I’m so sorry to hear about your situation. It’s so hard to stay in contact with someone you love, but who can’t love you the way you want them too. It sounds like you are in the “purgatory” phase of healing I describe in my book, “Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to An Ex Love.” I hope that you work through the healing process and are able to find closure. To help you I’m taking the liberty of adding you to get my “Heal Your Heart” bonus white paper. I’m also hard at work on an online program to help walk you through the steps of healing. I’ll let you know when it’s available. In the meantime, please practice the self care strategies I describe in chapter 10 of my book. You need to take care of yourself right now! Best, Lisa

  3. So I was in a toxic relationship like this. The guy went back to his ex twice and cheated on me during our time together. This last time, I tried to just back of to friends, but he wouldn’t accept it. His solution was a polyamorous relationship which I didn’t agree with. He claims we have a strong bond together and I admit there is a pull towards him. However, I had to think of myself. I blocked him or unfriended him on social media and on my phone. He keeps finding ways to contact me even now and its been 5 months, which stirs up those feelings all over again. I’m continuing the no contact, but how can I get him to stop. He has already admitted to not being able to stop thinking about me. I’m just worried that he will start showing up to my house. and even worse falling back into this toxic relationship.

    1. Hi Jennifer, I’m sorry to hear about this situation. It’s something that many of my clients have to cope with: recognizing that a relationship is toxic, and then having their boundaries repeatedly violated when they try to set limits and heal. Unfortunately these violations are a common characteristic of deeply unhealthy relationships. It’s so hard, because while YOU can abstain from initiating contact you have no control over someone else’s behaviors. The good news is that you have legal rights to not be harassed, if you are brave enough to use them. The definition of “stalking” is having someone continue to contact you after you have asked them not to. It can be very difficult to consider obtaining a legal restraining order against someone you still have some feelings for, but unfortunately in the most extreme cases that can be required in order to stop the insanity for once and for all. Good luck with things. — L

  4. My son is a recovering addict. He and his “girl” Partied till they lost their home, almost the kids and the drama, deception, cheating and lies left him here at home batteling anxiety induced seizures , mental and mood disorders and yes a longing to reconnect with her. We (his family) know the toxicity of the relationship and are helpless. He is seeking professional help but it’s just not a quick fix. He is impatient and we just can’t take it anymore.

    1. Hi there. I’m so sorry to hear about everything your son has gone through. I am glad that he is seeking the support of a professional. If he’s open to it, I hope that you share this article and some of the podcasts I’ve done about breakups and recovery. I hope that it helps him find his way to peace and freedom.

  5. My significant other isn’t good for me. He’s an addict he has problems with drinking and using crystal meth. I’m always helping him financially and give him attention whenever he commands it even.neglecting our son at times. The fear of him changing once I leave him is debilitating and I feel like a bad person breaking up my family

    1. Angela, thank you so much for reaching out to me and allowing me the opportunity to support you with this. It is so hard when someone you love is not okay. I hear through your words how much you want him to be healthy and the partner you know he can be, and that it feels scary to leave and possibly miss out on the amazing relationship you hope you could have. However, your number one job is for YOU to be healthy and strong for your son. I would strongly encourage you to get some support for yourself so that you can maintain your boundaries, set healthy limits, and create a stable and healthy home for your child. You might consider calling “2-1-1” from any phone to be connected to the United Way system in your area. They can provide you with referrals to supportive services and affordable therapists in your community. Here’s the website if that is easier for you: https://www.unitedway.org/local/united-states. You might also consider attending an Al-Anon support group in your community. Connecting with others going through the same thing can be enormously helpful and empowering. https://www.al-anon.alateen.org/find-a-meeting Lastly, you might also consider reaching out to your local department of social services for support in making a plan to keep you and your child healthy and safe, and to help get your partner in a recovery program (and motivate him to complete it). I wish you all the best Angela. Good luck with things… LMB

  6. Wow Article so touching and real. I was in a marriage where we both would act out and cheated each other obsessively in the last year’s .. now we are separated I don’t need to drink of be with any women besides emotional support.

  7. Dear Marie,

    I feel terrible because I am guilty of getting addicted to my ex. We had a difficult relationship and when we finally broke up I couldn’t stop obsessing about it and really wanted her back. I sent a lot of messages and emails and when she said stop I did but after a few months or so I couldn’t resist the urges and apologised to her for my actions which I feel just made it worse and reminded her of my previous behaviour. I feel crazy now and terrible for doing it. I know there is no way to go back and change the past. Am I able to forgive myself for this? I just feel so bad.

    1. Hi Cressida,

      I’m so sorry you’re going through this. I think that you’re having such a common (though terrible) experience that many people in this situation share: Feeling like you’re not really in control of yourself because your feelings are so strong. That’s the nature of a ruptured attachment. Humans are really hard-wired in this way, so I hope that you’re not too hard on yourself.

      If it’s helpful I recently did a podcast that touches on just this subject, and how to heal: https://www.growingself.com/how-to-repair-your-self-esteem-after-a-breakup-2/

      If you’d like some extra support, you might also consider joining my new (totally free) online breakup support group on Facebook. It’s not a “therapy” group or anything, but rather a secret breakup / divorce recovery Facebook group for people going through just this thing to support each other. It’s a great community. If you’d like to join (because it’s a secret group) you have to send me a message through FB so I can add you: https://www.facebook.com/drlisabobby/ Hope you get in touch! LMB

      1. Hi Lisa Marie, thank you so much for your help and for taking the time to reply. So getting addicted to an ex happens do a lot of people? Its weird because I seem to only feel attracted to people that don’t treat me that well and the minute someone does its like I lose that attraction to them. I let the wrong type of people get a hold on me and its a habit I need to break.

  8. I’m in absolute agony at the moment. Yesterday my girlfriend told me to F off so I blocked her on Facebook, but not on my mobile phone and she still has my landline. But, usually she phones me and gets back in contact, within a day. I don’t think she is going to this time.

    I keep looking at her photos on Facebook. I miss her so much and every part of me aches for her. But, when we were together, she would make me so jealous by flirting with other women. She’d say things like the other woman who was friends with her got turned on in her company. I told her, I don’t want to hear things like this, but she said it is just part of who she is. I don’t know if it was me or her that was the problem.

    In the first month of going out with her she told me a sob story about her ex who apparently abused her. To get out of the house she needed a considerate amount of money to leave and me being the kind person I am, lent it to her. I feel ridiculous now and it’s been several months since I lent it her and I fear I may not get it back even though she promised beyond a doubt that she would have paid it back.

    I have mental health problems and she is a trained psychiatric nurse so I wonder if it was my insecurities that put her off and she saw me as inferior to her. I wanted it to work so badly. Right from the start she told me that she loved me and then she went more distant and didn’t message me as often as she did at first. She said she had so many hopes and plans for me and my life with her. I don’t know what went wrong, but it hurts like hell right now.

    1. Melissa, thanks for sharing your story with our community here. Wow – what an agonizing situation! What you shared makes this sound like there were emotionally abusive (possibly financially predatory) qualities to this relationship. I hear that it hurts so much, and also that you’re saying that this was not a healthy situation for you, and that it’s probably good it ended. For extra support you might consider joining our free online breakup support Facebook group. (It’s a secret “hidden” group, so you have to message me directly on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/drlisabobby) to be added. I have numerous podcasts on the subject of breakups and recovery that might help you on the blog / podcast page. In particular one of the most recent, “Healing Your Self Esteem After a Breakup” may resonate with you. My book Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to an Ex Love or online breakup recovery program Heal Your Broken Heart may also be helpful to you as you take steps towards healing.

      I know I just threw about a zillion resources at you, and I hope that’s not overwhelming. I just hear how much you’re hurting, and want you to know that support and guidance is available. Wishing you all the best… LMB

  9. Unfortunately planting the seeds of doubt as to the healthiness of a relationship is itself going to be a trigger. When ‘work through issues’ gets trumped by ‘don’t bother having issues’, and when someone waivers back and forth between these, that is where relationships between 2 honestly loving people fail. (this doesn’t apply to couples where one person is in it for money or non-emotional benefits)

    Articles like this tend to feed doubt. Which is really sad and scary because it comes from such a helpful, nice, supportive idea. But sooner or later every relationship has ups and downs and the minute there’s a down and one person thinks ‘this isn’t what I signed up for’, there’s the doubt, there’s the trigger, that’s the thing that ends the relationship. Changing one’s mind later, deciding to try the relationship again, is what continues the relationship. And yeah, relationships have ups and downs and so the cycle will also continue until the person who doubts when things get tough decides to not run.

    It’s really not any different than the individual cycles we experience within ourselves, happy, sad, neutral, something happens get sad, something happens get happy. Cycles of stress are natural, normal, not things that can be gotten rid of. And this is true for relationships too. What can change from the past is your -individual perception of stress- and your -individual reaction to it-

    If you have a roller coaster relationship, you have to decide whether that’s what you want. If you -COMMIT- to a relationship with high highs and low lows, you’ll still be fulfilled because, as you said, it’s your own choice.

    Because of the natural cycles of stress that exist, a relationship without commitment is doomed to fail because someone’s going to leave when the stress gets too high. This isn’t any different than an individual who mentally checks out or commits suicide when life gets too hard; they look for an escape and take it.

    1. Hi Veronica! Thank you so much for your thoughtful comments and perspective about this article. I think you bring up so many excellent points about how ALL relationships have ups and downs, and that part of being in a healthy, committed, long term relationship is understanding that sometimes things do feel hard. I could not agree more that successful relationships require tolerance, acceptance, patience, and frankly hard work — particularly during the inevitable “rough patches” that all couples face. Furthermore, what we emphasize in our approach to marriage counseling and couples therapy is that couples who do successfully whether hard times together often create even deeper connection and a more satisfying relationship than ever before. Also these couples tend to have stronger, more secure relationships than “untested” couples who have not (yet!) gone through hard times together. I wish more people shared your perspective, and commitment to, well, commitment!

      And, at the same time, it is also true that sometimes people get trapped in extremely unhealthy situations. Unfortunately things like domestic violence and abusive relationships (verbally abusive, emotionally abusive, and physically / sexually abusive relationships) are real. I have also worked with a number of people who became attached to sociopaths, narcissists, addicts, or people who were so emotionally unwell themselves that they were literally not able to love… which was, sadly, the case with Tom. In many other situations, one person is committed to and attached to someone who is not as committed or attached to them (and never will be). In these tragic situations, the most healthy option is to acknowledge that reality, and move on. Which can be so, so hard to do — as evidenced by the data around how many times women go back to physically abusive partners, for example.

      Because it can be so challenging for people to know whether they are in a fundamentally healthy, good, “keeper” relationship that’s just going through a rough patch, OR a genuinely troubled, toxic relationship that is unlikely to get better, I have actually written and podcasted (is that a word?) on the subject just for that reason. You might consider listening to “How Healthy is Your Relationship” (and the companion quiz) for more information about how to realistically assess a relationship, and know whether it’s time to deepen your commitment and work to improve things…. or liberate yourself and find a healthier situation.

      Thank you again for your thoughtful commentary Veronica. I’m so glad to have readers like you who are willing to participate in such an authentic way, and open the door to a real dialogue about the complexities of relationships. All the best, Lisa

  10. Hey Lisa, great article and some very good comments 🙂

    I’m just out a 4 year relationship with with what I believe to be a narcisist.

    She abused me physically, emotionally, mentally , cut off my friends and family by declaring them oxygen thieves and in the end whenever I stepped out of line or disobeyed her rules I was punished by silence or threats of her going out to sleep with men. I never know if this really happened tho.

    We split , reconnected, honeymoon , argued , split many of times. Recently it became daily so I left.

    I’m moving into my own property next week and will have my son according to agreements she made, which I’m happy with.

    Half of me just feels like I’m only doing all this to show her I can live without her but really the other half of me is hoping she maybe takes time to reflect and hopefully one day , 6 months later maybe , she wants to try again.

    Surreal, stupid, desperate?

    I know she’s broken and I know id sacrifice my life to make hers a happy one…. But I’m not naive, I know she’s thinking she’s the victim and everything I got I ‘deserved’ … I know nobody deserves violence or abuse.

    I just wish she would grow out if it one day but alas she doesn’t.. she’s 34 , I’m 35.

    I thought love could cure everything but meh sometimes I guess you end up wasting love on somebody who will never appreciate it?

    1. Mark, thank you so much for sharing your story. I’m really, really glad that you are taking steps to get yourself out of this situation and create a healthier environment for yourself and your son. On that note, something to consider: Is your son safe when he is with her? Like, mentally and emotionally safe? If things were that bad for you, a grown man, I am troubled by what your young child’s experience might be like. If you are worried about him, it may be worth enlisting the support of the courts to help you protect him. Just a thought.

      But as for your experience about half of you feeling good and excited about your “liberation” there’s still another part of you that is hoping that she will grow into someone who can be a healthy partner for you…. it’s totally normal. It’s hope that sustains these types of relationships: Hope that they can be different, or the hope that if you said or did the right thing they would be kind and loving towards you, finally. This is exactly the emotional dynamic that keeps (primarily) women coming back to patently abusive relationships.

      It’s really hard when to know if you should cut your losses and just be done done done. Many people, when the add up the evidence intellectually, know that it’s not fix-able. But when they’re still attached to someone, they have feelings of hope, sadness, longing, that can whisper to them, and make them think, “….maybe….” My client certainly did that for a long time, before he ran out of time. I hope you don’t waste too much more of your time here on earth doing the same.

      So, basically two choices here: You can decide for yourself that she sucks and you deserve better, and shake the dust off your feet and move on to find a healthy relationship… or you can wait, and hope, until the choice is made for you, one way or another.

      It honestly sounds like you are doing a great job of supporting yourself towards health: Moving out, understanding what she is, reminding yourself that these feelings you’re having are probably not ones to listen to, finding articles like this one that encourage you to keep going, and writing to me / us for confirmation that what you are doing is right.

      You’re right Mark. Don’t look back.

      xoxo, LMB

  11. Hi lisa,

    I feel like I’m crazy. I met a man about 5 months ago. He started out ‘normal’ but after a little while I figured out that he is a very heavy drinker (gets blackout drunk) at least once a week. He orders food galore and leaves his car at the bar overnight without remembering. He also smokes pot. This is just not my lifestyle. I have kids from a previous relationship and I don’t want him.around them like that. Also, he is extremely jealous and always accuses me of cheating if I don’t respond to a text within minutes. He gets mad at me if I can’t stay over at his house to sleep. One night he threw his lit cigarette at my fave because I said I had to go, and called me awful names including bi**h, c**t, sl*t ect. But I keep going back when he apologizes. What’s wrong with me?? He even sent a private picture of me to all of his friends. I was humiliated.

    1. What?? Jen. You are describing domestic violence. This is not a toxic relationship, this is an abusive relationship. This is not going to get better, only worse. Staying in contact with this person could literally kill you. Everything that you have described here is horrifying.

      For the love of God (and your children) stop this immediately. Do whatever you need to do to block him from your life. However given what you described you may need to get professional help — this sounds like a person who may come after you if you try to break things off. Please visit this website, https://www.thehotline.org/ and call this number: 1-800-799-7233. This is a national domestic violence crisis center. You can get on the phone immediately with a DV counselor who can help you make a plan for your safety and for your children’s safety. Tell them everything that is going on, and they’ll connect you with resources and even a place to go.

      Please do this Jen. This is not a relationship issue, this is a safety issue. There is nothing here for you but danger. It is not your fault, nor can you fix this. Call them right now!!

      Will be thinking of you,
      Lisa

  12. Hi Dr. Bobby

    I have a question around being in the constant cycle of toxic relationships (intimate, friends, life). A few weeks ago I broke it off with someone who showed me he was not emotionally supportive when I needed him to be. He showed me that I could not depend upon him and trust he would be present in a time of need. This is just one of many issues I have had in relationships. I give 110% of myself- mind, body, spirit- to my relationships, and they give about 50% (more or less). I have been in abusive (mental, physical, emotional, sexual) relationships since I was 15 (I am in my late 40s). It has taken me a long time to get to the point where I am becoming clearer about what I want, what I need, what will work for me. But, I keep finding myself in the cycle of toxic relationships. Seems no matter how much I learn, how much work I do to find my own self-strength, I can’t seem to get out of this cycle.
    Since this article is comparing it to being addicted to substances, I am wondering, how does someone get out of their toxic relationship addiction cycle? Being addicted to cigarettes means stopping smoking, and never smoking again. How does this equate to relationships? Does this mean to stop relationships and never be in a relationship again?
    I know I am doing better with my addiction as I have saved more of myself this time around than I usually do. I walked away a lot sooner than I normally would. And, I am not responding to his attempts to get me to talk to him (this never goes well, he gaslights me and turns the issues around on me and says I am causing problems, he uses the vulnerable information I shared with him in faith and trust as tools to manipulate me or shame me…toxic).
    I want out of the cycle of toxic relationships, with others and myself. Hope you have suggestions on how to break the cycle, heal, and then find the path to healthier relationships.

    Thank you
    T

    1. Tami, I appreciate your heartfelt question. I just might devote a podcast episode to this one, so please stay tuned to the Love, Happiness and Success Podcast. (Or follow me on Instagram – I always post when I publish a new podcast or answer a listener question).

      The very, short, simple answer Tami, is that in order to change this long-standing pattern you need to do some personal growth work. If I was your therapist or life coach, I’d want to start by diving in to where this is coming from, and then help you get self awareness about how you get involved in these situations. We’d also be doing some work that would help you change your “relationship thermostat” to begin experiencing emotionally healthy people as more attractive, and romantic-disasters-waiting-to-happen as less attractive.

      This is not something that you can accomplish by reading a book or a blog post or listening to a podcast. This is transformational personal growth work with a therapist or coach who is able to ask you powerful questions, shine a light on things you may not currently be aware of, and who can help you have the healing experiences you need to grow on a foundational level.

      This is not an “answer” but rather an invitation for you to embark on a journey. I do hope you consider taking it Tami. You sound like a very nice person who has been through a lot and who wants more for herself. I believe that you deserve the chance to heal and grow, and I hope you do too. YOU are worth investing in.

      Respectfully,
      Dr. Lisa Marie Bobby

  13. As a parent of a twenty year old son who lives with me and is in a toxic relationship how can I help him? My husband wants tough love and to throw him out because this relationship is an addiction. I am concerned about his mental health struggles. He needs a safe place and our support.

    1. Amy, I completely agree. It’s so hard to see adult children struggle. Is he open to getting involved in counseling or coaching? Though you haven’t shared a lot of information my sense is that he is feeling really stuck. You are very welcome to share breakup recovery articles, breakup podcasts, etc from the GrowingSelf.com site. That might be a starting point. You might also leave the Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to an Ex Love book laying around. I have had people purchase our online breakup recovery class for their teens and twenty-somethings. Lastly, would you son be open to talking to someone? Getting him connected with a breakup recovery coach or counselor could help him make progress. I don’t know if he’d consider even meeting with someone for a free consultation to see how it feels, but if he started working with a professional it could make a big difference. But clearly, you care so much about him — he’s lucky to have a mom like you in his corner! Lisa

    2. Wow… great article. My 17 year long marriage with my wife has completely to hell. I love her so much it hurts I want to be physical with her I want intimacy and affection from her and she wants no part of it. All she wants to do is go out with her friends especially one in particular all the time. She tells me that affection is stupid and has basically completely emotionally deattached from me. we fight every day. She tells me that she loves me but that she’s not head-over-heels in love with me. The problem is after 17 years on still head-over-heels in love with her. That combined with the fact that we have 8 kids… 4 together and 4 adopted complicates me just leaving her.

      She went through a bought of depression and ran up about $85000 worth of credit card debt a couple years ago and we’re facing bankruptcy from it now. I can forgive this and I have I can deal with bankruptcy what I can’t deal with is the feeling that I’m not loved. Wanting physical intimacy from someone who has almost no interest in it. I crave her and the physical intimacy daily. It is like an addiction, when we are intimate together, maybe once a month, it brings me to a new high. But it quickly wears off when i get reminded the next day that others seem more important than me or my feelings.

      I want to divorce her and leave her that she is my 1st love my 1st marriage then my person I’ve ever been intimate with and I love very deeply and I’m having a difficult time walking away. I also worry about her financially be unable to support herself and the kids even with me paying child support or whatever. Im stuck. Both financially and emotionally. Sadly, I have given serious thought into cheating on her to get my emotional needs met, but i never have… I’m just not that type of a person and she’s still the only woman I want. I feel that she is content to live with me, but not interested in being lovers.

      We have started seeing a therapist but i don’t know that it’s going to help. I told her the other day that it was like trying to piece back together something that had been ran through a shredder it seems impossible. I am addicted to being physically intimate with her… Which may be in her husband always thought was a good thing but I guess it’s not whenever the other person is not the same way.

  14. Hi Dr.
    I was in a relationship with someone that I met in a 12 step program. I had just a year after a painful relapse which was preceded by a decade of recovery. He (apparently) had 2 years. We got along great and I felt like I was getting the ‘ Promises’ . However, he still lived in his mom’s basement ( at 50 years old) , where I was a professional supporting myself. he drank heavily in my presence but felt it was OK because it was not his ( or mine) drug of choice. However he attended meetings and lied about who he was. Here comes the tough part; all of a sudden I suspected that he was using again because of his behaviors. He never offered to pay for anything and even borrowed money from me. Anyway, it all came to head one night when I woke up and realized that he was up all night, sitting on my couch watching TV. A few days later a friend of his, who I know is still using, called me up and told me horrible, intimate things that he said about me. The friend said that he told me ” just so that I would know the truth” ?? They were both living double lives and saw me as a threat because I knew the truth. I was devastated . However, I am still struggling with what is the truth, why did this happen and did I ” make it all up” as they are saying about me to all of our mutual sober friends. The term they use for me is ” psycho b#$%^h” . I am still wrestling with this whole bizarre scenario. He treated me like the most special person in the world around his kids and family, but apparently thought differently about me to his friends. I spoke with him recently and all he could say was ‘ You DID this to me !!” I said how would you have felt if this happened to one of your daughters? his reply’ I would kill the person. I said then why did you let it happen to me?? And he said ” It’s always about you !!’ And I wound up apologizing. Please help !!

    1. Fran, I hope that you hear this with the love and respect with which it is intended: I have no idea what’s going on with this guy and I don’t care. What is so much more important here is that it’s time for YOU to do some growth work around your relationships.

      I am hearing in your story that you may have patterns around missing red flags, you have trouble distinguishing emotionally safe people from unsafe people, you get attached to taxic people, and that you continue to try to get love and validation from people who mistreat you.

      I will not even attempt to speculate about why that is so, but I think it would be a really, really good idea for you to get involved with a really good, evidence-based therapist in your area who has experience around trauma and attachment theory. (It would be in your best interest for you to work with someone who could meet with you in person, not online).

      It sounds like you have done really important and effective work around your sobriety, and that is wonderful — all of that was likely hard won, and it’s yours to keep. And, as I’m sure you know, the work of recovery in some ways only begins once the substance use is managed. Then the true, deep work of healing can begin. You deserve that Fran. I wish you all the best on your continued journey of growth and healing. Lisa Marie Bobby

  15. I feel a strong urge to reach out to my toxic person. I don’t understand them, & I have so many questions, but I feel like it would just be a waste of time. They’re so evasive… should I just save these questions for my therapist?

  16. Hello,
    I have been in a relationship with my now ex for 8 years. We have a cycle of behavior. I break up with him, he goes on dating sites and has sexual relations with many women, I reach out because I miss him, I compete with his dating site women to win him back, we get back together for about a year, I break up again and the cycle starts all over again. I am always the one to take the blame for the failure of the relationship although I know it is both of us that cause the break-up. He has a drinking problem and I don’t feel like he has any value on the relationship and that he takes me for granted. If I ever have any type of emotion about anything, he says that I am making him feel bad and he gets mad at me. He is the only one that is allowed to be upset or angry about anything. I am identifying my issues and working on them. I have even told my ex that I know what I do and I am working on it, but he states he does not want to be in a relationship with anyone at the moment.

    1. Jeri, this sounds like an extremely toxic situation. I sincerely hope that you reach out for the help and support for YOU, in order to release your attachment to this person and create the healthy, happy, reciprocal relationship that you deserve. All the best, Lisa Marie Bobby

  17. Toms story hits soo close to home. Doesn’t start the same nor hoping it ends the same either but I’m there. Iv found a mirrored relationship that I can’t shake. I walk on egg shells. I have to apologize for everything. And I’m always getting dumped left desperate to be back with her. Going on 3 years now. I love her. She seduces me. But always leaves me insecure and with anxiety. Her recent issue with my 11 year old , calling him a lying monster who needs therapy, then ending us and blocking me. I’m a single dad 2 kids full time. I know I should be feeling totally offended but I obsess over being Back together. I can’t shake it. Please share whatever advice you gave Tom.

    1. David, I am glad that you found this cautionary tale. But I’m afraid that the path ahead of you goes way beyond “advice.” The process of breaking your addiction to a toxic relationship requires active work with a therapist or coach who can help you break this unhealthy attachment so that you can not just protect your children, but yourself.

      What Tom was dealing with was an addiction to an unhealthy relationship, and the process of healing is one that is very much like recovering from any other addiction. It is not an event and there is no “advice” that will help — it is a process that requires time and energy, tools, and a guide.

      The clock ran out on Tom before he was able to break his addiction fully. Since he died, and partly because of it, I wrote the book, “Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to an Ex Love.” There were times during my work with Tom that I felt helpless to help him break free, because I didn’t fully understand the power that being addicted to a toxic relationship can have over people. After he passed I committed to finding out more about what was happening so that I was able to more effectively help others in the future. I really, really hope that the work and the research that I did (that Tom and I did not have when we worked together) helps you: If it does, it will give meaning to Tom’s tragedy. (No pressure, haha).

      Anyway, David, I sincerely hope that you have the determination and courage to do this important work so that you can not just break free, but go on to create the happy, healthy relationship you deserve. I hope you read the book and that it helps you. For most people, reading a book is not enough though. (Like if you were an alcoholic, reading a self-help book about alcoholism is only one small part of the recovery process).

      Many people need the support of a good coach or therapist who understands the science behind relationship addiction and who can help you, step by step, through the recovery process. If you would like to do that with someone at Growing Self, you are welcome to schedule a free consultation to get the ball rolling.

      Wishing you all the best David on your journey of recovery David. I believe that Tom is out there somewhere rooting for you too! 🙂

      Lisa

  18. My wife is verbally, mentally and has been in other ways abusive to me at times. She’s been having an affair for almost a year now too. I know I need to get out but the kids will suffer and she won’t be able to do it all on her own. How am I supposed to get out of this or around and through this. It’s not just cut and dried, get out and don’t look back. I don’t think there’s a shred of hope to fix it, because she doesn’t want to except to not be alone.

    1. This sounds like a terrible situation. I am so sorry that you’re going through this. I respect the fact that you are thinking about the needs of your children and what would be best for them. They are lucky to have you. This sounds like a very complex situation with a lot of moving parts, and the best advice I can give you is to get involved in your OWN therapy or coaching so that YOU have some support right now. I’d imaging that the work ahead will involve your getting clear about what is best for you and your children, and making a solid plan to take action when the time is right. At some point, I’m guessing that it will involve working through a lot of big feelings like grief and anger too. It’s going to be a journey, and one that will be measured in months at least, and probably years. Get connected with a good therapist who can walk by your side through all the ups, downs, twists, and turns in your future. It sounds like you’re taking care of a lot of people, and you deserve to have care and support too.

      Wishing you all the best on your journey to healing,
      Lisa

  19. Hello,

    This is a great article. I guess I am wondering if I am in a toxic addicted relationship. I have been living with a man for 3 months now and in the beginning it was great, then the fits of rage and fighting began. One fit went on for 5 hours as he tore the house apart looking for his tape measure that he was sure I put somewhere or someone had stolen it. Quite scary… he found it a couple weeks later (no apology). There are a lots of theses incidents, and he with holds sex like it’s a reward for good behavior. I am not an unattractive woman by any means and he never gives me compliments and if I take extra time to look pretty he just asks where I’m going. I’m in my early 50s and I had a complete hysterectomy when I was 39 and I go into emotional ups and downs and so I have been blaming the ups and downs on my hormones. I actually think they come from his being standoffish and elusive and my feeling unwanted. He is an active addict and drinks a lot and the last time we went out he totally lost it in front of my friends and co workers. Yelled and screamed at me all the way home which is a 45 minute drive. I’m leaving a lot out, however I had to be away for a couple of days and he ignores my texts (like always) and I am trying to just be and be happy without him. Why is this so hard? I just need to know if I am in a bad situation..,

  20. Hi Dr,

    I am addicted to a person I can’t let go of, a best friend. I was addicted to her nurturing and mothering feeling she gave me after my ex husband left. Long story short, I was adopted and had sexual abuse in my past. So I am the unhealthy one. I have tried for years and we go through the cycle again and again. She made me feel whole and I’m lost without her. I’ve done years of counseling, can you recommend the best books that i can read as I still want to become healthy and able to break free. She is in no contact mode and does this quite often for months at a time and I go crazy. And advice would be welcomed.

  21. I’m addicted to this dude and I know our relationship is toxic. And I act like it’s fine. Reality I’m not fine. I just don’t want him with anyone else. He controls everything of what I can or can’t say. I can’t post him. And he wants a child with me. And he says I can’t post him with the child. It’s too much. I can’t handle it.

  22. I was on and off with my ex for 9 months. I kept trying to leave him because he was an alcoholic (an angry drunk), manipulative, gaslighting and really really mean. He’d constantly accuse me of cheating or seeing other men and I’ve had to repeat myself over and over again, telling him I have never done any of those things. He’s done so many things to me that have traumatized me significantly i.e put me into a chokehold because I had slapped him for slut shaming me and then telling his friends later on that I was punching him and that he could take it, coercing me into having sex with him when I was crying, etc. I broke things off, blocked him on social media and changed my number in November, but I ended up contacting him again a month in a half later. At first, I had just wanted to talk to him to relinquish any unsettled feelings, but we hooked up, I was convinced we were gonna get back together, but he didn’t initiate any calls or messages. I noticed he wasn’t interested and then after a couple weeks he had told me he had feelings for and hooked up with someone else. So I was thinking, okay he’s officially moved on, I’ve already determined that he’s a jerk, so I’ll move on. I told him to stop calling me and he stopped for a while. But then he texted me again a couple weeks ago saying he needed to talk to me, we talked, I tried setting boundaries, he crossed those boundaries and we ended up hooking up twice. I recently found out that he got into a relationship with the girl he has feelings for and he basically cheated…I asked him what our relationship was and he had said, he doesn’t know and that I was on trial, which means he’s still trying to choI’m sorry if this is too much detail, but to sum things up, he is the hugest jerk I’ve ever met and unfortunately he’s been my very first boyfriend or “love” or lack thereof.. He’s got me wrapped around his finger and for some odd reason, I can’t let him go. It’s hard for me to ignore his calls..

  23. What about the wife’s side in this? My now ex husband has become addicted to toxic relationships and cheated twice now. I am the wife sitting at home in this scenario. How do I get past all those feeings of insecurity, betrayal, not enough, etc when he keeps making promises and then going back to the addiction. He cheated on the new girl too… so really he’s kind of like the example on the podcast.

  24. I have been in a relationship for 1.5 years under false pretenses that I had filed for divorce. Which I had not but was madly in love with this partner. She found out through a message to me which was, from the way written, an attempt to get back together. Caught in a web of lies and only because I did not want to lose my new love I continued to try to lie to get out of it only making it worse. Now I cannot let my new partner go but she is done with the lies and inability to trust me. While my wife wants to forgive me and get back together. I truly want my new partner to be with me but she is beyond reluctant as I lied to her about my previous relationship and multiple other items to continue the facade.,

    1. Jim, given what you’re describing, I wonder if the best course of action may be for you to not be in any relationship with anyone until you get yourself figured out and get to a place where you can be a reliable, trustworthy partner. Wishing you all the best….. Lisa

  25. I have been in a relationship with someone for about a year who has some serious emotional baggage, which he seems unable to even start to deal with. I’ve been dumped several times over that year, and kept being drawn back in because I believed the way he was treating me was in some way forgivable, a result of him not being able to cope with the emotional turmoil he was experiencing. I was kept a secret from his family due to some of this baggage, with my stuff I left at his house packed up when they were coming over. So I’d be dumped but as soon as I put some distance between us he’d appear again with a phone call or text, asking me to come over and we’d start again, only for him to disappear again shortly after. I just feel like I’ve been kept on a piece of elastic. I was increasingly being blamed, I was “making things impossible” and stressing him out, if I even dared to discuss how the problems he was experiencing could be overcome. True you shouldn’t try to fix people but I was doing it for me too, as it was effecting my life. Now I find myself being sent a text from him saying “we are over, i’m not going back’, as if I am the only one that has been pursuing this relationship.

  26. What a terrible situation for you to have been in. You know, I think it’s really common for people trapped in a toxic relationship to go around and around a few times until they can begin to see the toxic relationship patterns they’ve been dealing with. I can understand how it’s enraging to now be manipulated and made out to be the pursuer, but I would encourage you to not take the bait and argue back. In genuinely toxic relationships, that type of emotional game-playing and the need to “defend yourself” is actually part of what can keep you trapped in this dynamic. Better to just block this person and remove their ability to communicate with you at all, ever again. That will keep you from being baited and tormented, so that you can get far, far away from all this. Did you check out the “Leaving a Toxic Relationship” podcast yet? I hope you listen to it! Wishing you all the best, Dr. Lisa

  27. how do I stop wanting to go back to a man who only ends up putting me down
    He blames me now for the break up saying we are not a couple

  28. Hi Judy,
    This is such a hard situation when you’re emotionally attached to someone who is not treating you well. That’s the common theme for many Exaholics — knowing intellectually that they need to move on but really not being able to. Relationships are addictive. By treating this attachment to a person the way you’d treat any other unwanted “attachment” (i.e., “addiction”) you will finally be able to recover and move on. You may consider checking out my book: “Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to An Ex Love” for more tips and insight. In the meantime, please be gentle and compassionate with yourself during this exquisitely painful process. All the best, Lisa

  29. It´s an addiction, just like alkohol or other things that make you sick.

    throw the bottle away! Close the door, and keep it closed.
    Don´t look at his number in whatsap to see if he´s online, don´t look at his facebook-profil.

    We don´t need drama, there is plenty in the world, we don´t need any more.
    But for sure, we don´t need someone, who doesn´t make us feel good.
    Love should lift us up, anything else is toxic.

  30. Great advice Silke, I agree that staying away is best… if you can. It’s hard to sometimes though! That’s why recovery is a process. Thanks for sharing your words of wisdom. — Lisa

  31. how do i stop loving someone who doesn’t love me the same way back they say im special to them and their best friend. but being her friend is killing me in the inside. i cry at times. but she always tells me its not gnna happen but i dont wanna lose her, i have cut her off to try and just leave that part of my life in the past but i end up worse mentally. and now im scared to talk to any one …

  32. Angel — I’m so sorry to hear about your situation. It’s so hard to stay in contact with someone you love, but who can’t love you the way you want them too. It sounds like you are in the “purgatory” phase of healing I describe in my book, “Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to An Ex Love.” I hope that you work through the healing process and are able to find closure. To help you I’m taking the liberty of adding you to get my “Heal Your Heart” bonus white paper. I’m also hard at work on an online program to help walk you through the steps of healing. I’ll let you know when it’s available. In the meantime, please practice the self care strategies I describe in chapter 10 of my book. You need to take care of yourself right now! Best, Lisa

  33. So I was in a toxic relationship like this. The guy went back to his ex twice and cheated on me during our time together. This last time, I tried to just back of to friends, but he wouldn’t accept it. His solution was a polyamorous relationship which I didn’t agree with. He claims we have a strong bond together and I admit there is a pull towards him. However, I had to think of myself. I blocked him or unfriended him on social media and on my phone. He keeps finding ways to contact me even now and its been 5 months, which stirs up those feelings all over again. I’m continuing the no contact, but how can I get him to stop. He has already admitted to not being able to stop thinking about me. I’m just worried that he will start showing up to my house. and even worse falling back into this toxic relationship.

  34. Hi Jennifer, I’m sorry to hear about this situation. It’s something that many of my clients have to cope with: recognizing that a relationship is toxic, and then having their boundaries repeatedly violated when they try to set limits and heal. Unfortunately these violations are a common characteristic of deeply unhealthy relationships. It’s so hard, because while YOU can abstain from initiating contact you have no control over someone else’s behaviors. The good news is that you have legal rights to not be harassed, if you are brave enough to use them. The definition of “stalking” is having someone continue to contact you after you have asked them not to. It can be very difficult to consider obtaining a legal restraining order against someone you still have some feelings for, but unfortunately in the most extreme cases that can be required in order to stop the insanity for once and for all. Good luck with things. — L

  35. My son is a recovering addict. He and his “girl” Partied till they lost their home, almost the kids and the drama, deception, cheating and lies left him here at home batteling anxiety induced seizures , mental and mood disorders and yes a longing to reconnect with her. We (his family) know the toxicity of the relationship and are helpless. He is seeking professional help but it’s just not a quick fix. He is impatient and we just can’t take it anymore.

  36. Hi there. I’m so sorry to hear about everything your son has gone through. I am glad that he is seeking the support of a professional. If he’s open to it, I hope that you share this article and some of the podcasts I’ve done about breakups and recovery. I hope that it helps him find his way to peace and freedom.

  37. My significant other isn’t good for me. He’s an addict he has problems with drinking and using crystal meth. I’m always helping him financially and give him attention whenever he commands it even.neglecting our son at times. The fear of him changing once I leave him is debilitating and I feel like a bad person breaking up my family

  38. Angela, thank you so much for reaching out to me and allowing me the opportunity to support you with this. It is so hard when someone you love is not okay. I hear through your words how much you want him to be healthy and the partner you know he can be, and that it feels scary to leave and possibly miss out on the amazing relationship you hope you could have. However, your number one job is for YOU to be healthy and strong for your son. I would strongly encourage you to get some support for yourself so that you can maintain your boundaries, set healthy limits, and create a stable and healthy home for your child. You might consider calling “2-1-1” from any phone to be connected to the United Way system in your area. They can provide you with referrals to supportive services and affordable therapists in your community. Here’s the website if that is easier for you: https://www.unitedway.org/local/united-states. You might also consider attending an Al-Anon support group in your community. Connecting with others going through the same thing can be enormously helpful and empowering. https://www.al-anon.alateen.org/find-a-meeting Lastly, you might also consider reaching out to your local department of social services for support in making a plan to keep you and your child healthy and safe, and to help get your partner in a recovery program (and motivate him to complete it). I wish you all the best Angela. Good luck with things… LMB

  39. […] The article “Are You Addicted to a Toxic Relationship” was originally posted on Dr. Bobby’s “Love, Happiness and Success” blog at […]

  40. […] disappointed by people. We’ve taken risks, only to fall flat and feel humiliated for our efforts. Maybe toxic relationships have made you feel diminished. Perhaps you didn’t get your needs met at a time that you desperately needed support, and you are […]

  41. […] like the only thing that will stop the hurting. This is true even if they know intellectually that the relationship with their ex is toxic, and any contact will only bring more pain in the end. They still crave the temporary relief it […]

  42. […] like the only thing that will stop the hurting. This is true even if they know intellectually that the relationship with their ex is toxic, and any contact will only bring more pain in the end. They still crave the temporary relief it […]

  43. […] like the only thing that will stop the hurting. This is true even if they know intellectually that the relationship with their Ex is toxic, and any contact will only bring more pain in the end. They still crave the temporary relief it […]

  44. Wow Article so touching and real. I was in a marriage where we both would act out and cheated each other obsessively in the last year’s .. now we are separated I don’t need to drink of be with any women besides emotional support.

  45. Sounds like you’ve done a lot of great growth work Rob. Thanks for sharing your success story! LMB

  46. Dear Marie,

    I feel terrible because I am guilty of getting addicted to my ex. We had a difficult relationship and when we finally broke up I couldn’t stop obsessing about it and really wanted her back. I sent a lot of messages and emails and when she said stop I did but after a few months or so I couldn’t resist the urges and apologised to her for my actions which I feel just made it worse and reminded her of my previous behaviour. I feel crazy now and terrible for doing it. I know there is no way to go back and change the past. Am I able to forgive myself for this? I just feel so bad.

  47. Hi Cressida,

    I’m so sorry you’re going through this. I think that you’re having such a common (though terrible) experience that many people in this situation share: Feeling like you’re not really in control of yourself because your feelings are so strong. That’s the nature of a ruptured attachment. Humans are really hard-wired in this way, so I hope that you’re not too hard on yourself.

    If it’s helpful I recently did a podcast that touches on just this subject, and how to heal: https://www.growingself.com/how-to-repair-your-self-esteem-after-a-breakup-2/

    If you’d like some extra support, you might also consider joining my new (totally free) online breakup support group on Facebook. It’s not a “therapy” group or anything, but rather a secret breakup / divorce recovery Facebook group for people going through just this thing to support each other. It’s a great community. If you’d like to join (because it’s a secret group) you have to send me a message through FB so I can add you: https://www.facebook.com/drlisabobby/ Hope you get in touch! LMB

  48. I’m in absolute agony at the moment. Yesterday my girlfriend told me to F off so I blocked her on Facebook, but not on my mobile phone and she still has my landline. But, usually she phones me and gets back in contact, within a day. I don’t think she is going to this time.

    I keep looking at her photos on Facebook. I miss her so much and every part of me aches for her. But, when we were together, she would make me so jealous by flirting with other women. She’d say things like the other woman who was friends with her got turned on in her company. I told her, I don’t want to hear things like this, but she said it is just part of who she is. I don’t know if it was me or her that was the problem.

    In the first month of going out with her she told me a sob story about her ex who apparently abused her. To get out of the house she needed a considerate amount of money to leave and me being the kind person I am, lent it to her. I feel ridiculous now and it’s been several months since I lent it her and I fear I may not get it back even though she promised beyond a doubt that she would have paid it back.

    I have mental health problems and she is a trained psychiatric nurse so I wonder if it was my insecurities that put her off and she saw me as inferior to her. I wanted it to work so badly. Right from the start she told me that she loved me and then she went more distant and didn’t message me as often as she did at first. She said she had so many hopes and plans for me and my life with her. I don’t know what went wrong, but it hurts like hell right now.

  49. Melissa, thanks for sharing your story with our community here. Wow – what an agonizing situation! What you shared makes this sound like there were emotionally abusive (possibly financially predatory) qualities to this relationship. I hear that it hurts so much, and also that you’re saying that this was not a healthy situation for you, and that it’s probably good it ended. For extra support you might consider joining our free online breakup support Facebook group. (It’s a secret “hidden” group, so you have to message me directly on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/drlisabobby) to be added. I have numerous podcasts on the subject of breakups and recovery that might help you on the blog / podcast page. In particular one of the most recent, “Healing Your Self Esteem After a Breakup” may resonate with you. My book Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to an Ex Love or online breakup recovery program Heal Your Broken Heart may also be helpful to you as you take steps towards healing.

    I know I just threw about a zillion resources at you, and I hope that’s not overwhelming. I just hear how much you’re hurting, and want you to know that support and guidance is available. Wishing you all the best… LMB

  50. Hi Lisa Marie, thank you so much for your help and for taking the time to reply. So getting addicted to an ex happens do a lot of people? Its weird because I seem to only feel attracted to people that don’t treat me that well and the minute someone does its like I lose that attraction to them. I let the wrong type of people get a hold on me and its a habit I need to break.

  51. Unfortunately planting the seeds of doubt as to the healthiness of a relationship is itself going to be a trigger. When ‘work through issues’ gets trumped by ‘don’t bother having issues’, and when someone waivers back and forth between these, that is where relationships between 2 honestly loving people fail. (this doesn’t apply to couples where one person is in it for money or non-emotional benefits)

    Articles like this tend to feed doubt. Which is really sad and scary because it comes from such a helpful, nice, supportive idea. But sooner or later every relationship has ups and downs and the minute there’s a down and one person thinks ‘this isn’t what I signed up for’, there’s the doubt, there’s the trigger, that’s the thing that ends the relationship. Changing one’s mind later, deciding to try the relationship again, is what continues the relationship. And yeah, relationships have ups and downs and so the cycle will also continue until the person who doubts when things get tough decides to not run.

    It’s really not any different than the individual cycles we experience within ourselves, happy, sad, neutral, something happens get sad, something happens get happy. Cycles of stress are natural, normal, not things that can be gotten rid of. And this is true for relationships too. What can change from the past is your -individual perception of stress- and your -individual reaction to it-

    If you have a roller coaster relationship, you have to decide whether that’s what you want. If you -COMMIT- to a relationship with high highs and low lows, you’ll still be fulfilled because, as you said, it’s your own choice.

    Because of the natural cycles of stress that exist, a relationship without commitment is doomed to fail because someone’s going to leave when the stress gets too high. This isn’t any different than an individual who mentally checks out or commits suicide when life gets too hard; they look for an escape and take it.

  52. Hi Veronica! Thank you so much for your thoughtful comments and perspective about this article. I think you bring up so many excellent points about how ALL relationships have ups and downs, and that part of being in a healthy, committed, long term relationship is understanding that sometimes things do feel hard. I could not agree more that successful relationships require tolerance, acceptance, patience, and frankly hard work — particularly during the inevitable “rough patches” that all couples face. Furthermore, what we emphasize in our approach to marriage counseling and couples therapy is that couples who do successfully whether hard times together often create even deeper connection and a more satisfying relationship than ever before. Also these couples tend to have stronger, more secure relationships than “untested” couples who have not (yet!) gone through hard times together. I wish more people shared your perspective, and commitment to, well, commitment!

    And, at the same time, it is also true that sometimes people get trapped in extremely unhealthy situations. Unfortunately things like domestic violence and abusive relationships (verbally abusive, emotionally abusive, and physically / sexually abusive relationships) are real. I have also worked with a number of people who became attached to sociopaths, narcissists, addicts, or people who were so emotionally unwell themselves that they were literally not able to love… which was, sadly, the case with Tom. In many other situations, one person is committed to and attached to someone who is not as committed or attached to them (and never will be). In these tragic situations, the most healthy option is to acknowledge that reality, and move on. Which can be so, so hard to do — as evidenced by the data around how many times women go back to physically abusive partners, for example.

    Because it can be so challenging for people to know whether they are in a fundamentally healthy, good, “keeper” relationship that’s just going through a rough patch, OR a genuinely troubled, toxic relationship that is unlikely to get better, I have actually written and podcasted (is that a word?) on the subject just for that reason. You might consider listening to “How Healthy is Your Relationship” (and the companion quiz) for more information about how to realistically assess a relationship, and know whether it’s time to deepen your commitment and work to improve things…. or liberate yourself and find a healthier situation.

    Thank you again for your thoughtful commentary Veronica. I’m so glad to have readers like you who are willing to participate in such an authentic way, and open the door to a real dialogue about the complexities of relationships. All the best, Lisa

  53. Hey Lisa, great article and some very good comments 🙂

    I’m just out a 4 year relationship with with what I believe to be a narcisist.

    She abused me physically, emotionally, mentally , cut off my friends and family by declaring them oxygen thieves and in the end whenever I stepped out of line or disobeyed her rules I was punished by silence or threats of her going out to sleep with men. I never know if this really happened tho.

    We split , reconnected, honeymoon , argued , split many of times. Recently it became daily so I left.

    I’m moving into my own property next week and will have my son according to agreements she made, which I’m happy with.

    Half of me just feels like I’m only doing all this to show her I can live without her but really the other half of me is hoping she maybe takes time to reflect and hopefully one day , 6 months later maybe , she wants to try again.

    Surreal, stupid, desperate?

    I know she’s broken and I know id sacrifice my life to make hers a happy one…. But I’m not naive, I know she’s thinking she’s the victim and everything I got I ‘deserved’ … I know nobody deserves violence or abuse.

    I just wish she would grow out if it one day but alas she doesn’t.. she’s 34 , I’m 35.

    I thought love could cure everything but meh sometimes I guess you end up wasting love on somebody who will never appreciate it?

  54. Mark, thank you so much for sharing your story. I’m really, really glad that you are taking steps to get yourself out of this situation and create a healthier environment for yourself and your son. On that note, something to consider: Is your son safe when he is with her? Like, mentally and emotionally safe? If things were that bad for you, a grown man, I am troubled by what your young child’s experience might be like. If you are worried about him, it may be worth enlisting the support of the courts to help you protect him. Just a thought.

    But as for your experience about half of you feeling good and excited about your “liberation” there’s still another part of you that is hoping that she will grow into someone who can be a healthy partner for you…. it’s totally normal. It’s hope that sustains these types of relationships: Hope that they can be different, or the hope that if you said or did the right thing they would be kind and loving towards you, finally. This is exactly the emotional dynamic that keeps (primarily) women coming back to patently abusive relationships.

    It’s really hard when to know if you should cut your losses and just be done done done. Many people, when the add up the evidence intellectually, know that it’s not fix-able. But when they’re still attached to someone, they have feelings of hope, sadness, longing, that can whisper to them, and make them think, “….maybe….” My client certainly did that for a long time, before he ran out of time. I hope you don’t waste too much more of your time here on earth doing the same.

    So, basically two choices here: You can decide for yourself that she sucks and you deserve better, and shake the dust off your feet and move on to find a healthy relationship… or you can wait, and hope, until the choice is made for you, one way or another.

    It honestly sounds like you are doing a great job of supporting yourself towards health: Moving out, understanding what she is, reminding yourself that these feelings you’re having are probably not ones to listen to, finding articles like this one that encourage you to keep going, and writing to me / us for confirmation that what you are doing is right.

    You’re right Mark. Don’t look back.

    xoxo, LMB

  55. Hi lisa,

    I feel like I’m crazy. I met a man about 5 months ago. He started out ‘normal’ but after a little while I figured out that he is a very heavy drinker (gets blackout drunk) at least once a week. He orders food galore and leaves his car at the bar overnight without remembering. He also smokes pot. This is just not my lifestyle. I have kids from a previous relationship and I don’t want him.around them like that. Also, he is extremely jealous and always accuses me of cheating if I don’t respond to a text within minutes. He gets mad at me if I can’t stay over at his house to sleep. One night he threw his lit cigarette at my fave because I said I had to go, and called me awful names including bi**h, c**t, sl*t ect. But I keep going back when he apologizes. What’s wrong with me?? He even sent a private picture of me to all of his friends. I was humiliated.

  56. What?? Jen. You are describing domestic violence. This is not a toxic relationship, this is an abusive relationship. This is not going to get better, only worse. Staying in contact with this person could literally kill you. Everything that you have described here is horrifying.

    For the love of God (and your children) stop this immediately. Do whatever you need to do to block him from your life. However given what you described you may need to get professional help — this sounds like a person who may come after you if you try to break things off. Please visit this website, https://www.thehotline.org/ and call this number: 1-800-799-7233. This is a national domestic violence crisis center. You can get on the phone immediately with a DV counselor who can help you make a plan for your safety and for your children’s safety. Tell them everything that is going on, and they’ll connect you with resources and even a place to go.

    Please do this Jen. This is not a relationship issue, this is a safety issue. There is nothing here for you but danger. It is not your fault, nor can you fix this. Call them right now!!

    Will be thinking of you,
    Lisa

  57. Hi Dr. Bobby

    I have a question around being in the constant cycle of toxic relationships (intimate, friends, life). A few weeks ago I broke it off with someone who showed me he was not emotionally supportive when I needed him to be. He showed me that I could not depend upon him and trust he would be present in a time of need. This is just one of many issues I have had in relationships. I give 110% of myself- mind, body, spirit- to my relationships, and they give about 50% (more or less). I have been in abusive (mental, physical, emotional, sexual) relationships since I was 15 (I am in my late 40s). It has taken me a long time to get to the point where I am becoming clearer about what I want, what I need, what will work for me. But, I keep finding myself in the cycle of toxic relationships. Seems no matter how much I learn, how much work I do to find my own self-strength, I can’t seem to get out of this cycle.
    Since this article is comparing it to being addicted to substances, I am wondering, how does someone get out of their toxic relationship addiction cycle? Being addicted to cigarettes means stopping smoking, and never smoking again. How does this equate to relationships? Does this mean to stop relationships and never be in a relationship again?
    I know I am doing better with my addiction as I have saved more of myself this time around than I usually do. I walked away a lot sooner than I normally would. And, I am not responding to his attempts to get me to talk to him (this never goes well, he gaslights me and turns the issues around on me and says I am causing problems, he uses the vulnerable information I shared with him in faith and trust as tools to manipulate me or shame me…toxic).
    I want out of the cycle of toxic relationships, with others and myself. Hope you have suggestions on how to break the cycle, heal, and then find the path to healthier relationships.

    Thank you
    T

  58. As a parent of a twenty year old son who lives with me and is in a toxic relationship how can I help him? My husband wants tough love and to throw him out because this relationship is an addiction. I am concerned about his mental health struggles. He needs a safe place and our support.

  59. Amy, I completely agree. It’s so hard to see adult children struggle. Is he open to getting involved in counseling or coaching? Though you haven’t shared a lot of information my sense is that he is feeling really stuck. You are very welcome to share breakup recovery articles, breakup podcasts, etc from the GrowingSelf.com site. That might be a starting point. You might also leave the Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to an Ex Love book laying around. I have had people purchase our online breakup recovery class for their teens and twenty-somethings. Lastly, would you son be open to talking to someone? Getting him connected with a breakup recovery coach or counselor could help him make progress. I don’t know if he’d consider even meeting with someone for a free consultation to see how it feels, but if he started working with a professional it could make a big difference. But clearly, you care so much about him — he’s lucky to have a mom like you in his corner! Lisa

  60. Tami, I appreciate your heartfelt question. I just might devote a podcast episode to this one, so please stay tuned to the Love, Happiness and Success Podcast. (Or follow me on Instagram – I always post when I publish a new podcast or answer a listener question).

    The very, short, simple answer Tami, is that in order to change this long-standing pattern you need to do some personal growth work. If I was your therapist or life coach, I’d want to start by diving in to where this is coming from, and then help you get self awareness about how you get involved in these situations. We’d also be doing some work that would help you change your “relationship thermostat” to begin experiencing emotionally healthy people as more attractive, and romantic-disasters-waiting-to-happen as less attractive.

    This is not something that you can accomplish by reading a book or a blog post or listening to a podcast. This is transformational personal growth work with a therapist or coach who is able to ask you powerful questions, shine a light on things you may not currently be aware of, and who can help you have the healing experiences you need to grow on a foundational level.

    This is not an “answer” but rather an invitation for you to embark on a journey. I do hope you consider taking it Tami. You sound like a very nice person who has been through a lot and who wants more for herself. I believe that you deserve the chance to heal and grow, and I hope you do too. YOU are worth investing in.

    Respectfully,
    Dr. Lisa Marie Bobby

  61. Wow… great article. My 17 year long marriage with my wife has completely to hell. I love her so much it hurts I want to be physical with her I want intimacy and affection from her and she wants no part of it. All she wants to do is go out with her friends especially one in particular all the time. She tells me that affection is stupid and has basically completely emotionally deattached from me. we fight every day. She tells me that she loves me but that she’s not head-over-heels in love with me. The problem is after 17 years on still head-over-heels in love with her. That combined with the fact that we have 8 kids… 4 together and 4 adopted complicates me just leaving her.

    She went through a bought of depression and ran up about $85000 worth of credit card debt a couple years ago and we’re facing bankruptcy from it now. I can forgive this and I have I can deal with bankruptcy what I can’t deal with is the feeling that I’m not loved. Wanting physical intimacy from someone who has almost no interest in it. I crave her and the physical intimacy daily. It is like an addiction, when we are intimate together, maybe once a month, it brings me to a new high. But it quickly wears off when i get reminded the next day that others seem more important than me or my feelings.

    I want to divorce her and leave her that she is my 1st love my 1st marriage then my person I’ve ever been intimate with and I love very deeply and I’m having a difficult time walking away. I also worry about her financially be unable to support herself and the kids even with me paying child support or whatever. Im stuck. Both financially and emotionally. Sadly, I have given serious thought into cheating on her to get my emotional needs met, but i never have… I’m just not that type of a person and she’s still the only woman I want. I feel that she is content to live with me, but not interested in being lovers.

    We have started seeing a therapist but i don’t know that it’s going to help. I told her the other day that it was like trying to piece back together something that had been ran through a shredder it seems impossible. I am addicted to being physically intimate with her… Which may be in her husband always thought was a good thing but I guess it’s not whenever the other person is not the same way.

  62. Hi Dr.
    I was in a relationship with someone that I met in a 12 step program. I had just a year after a painful relapse which was preceded by a decade of recovery. He (apparently) had 2 years. We got along great and I felt like I was getting the ‘ Promises’ . However, he still lived in his mom’s basement ( at 50 years old) , where I was a professional supporting myself. he drank heavily in my presence but felt it was OK because it was not his ( or mine) drug of choice. However he attended meetings and lied about who he was. Here comes the tough part; all of a sudden I suspected that he was using again because of his behaviors. He never offered to pay for anything and even borrowed money from me. Anyway, it all came to head one night when I woke up and realized that he was up all night, sitting on my couch watching TV. A few days later a friend of his, who I know is still using, called me up and told me horrible, intimate things that he said about me. The friend said that he told me ” just so that I would know the truth” ?? They were both living double lives and saw me as a threat because I knew the truth. I was devastated . However, I am still struggling with what is the truth, why did this happen and did I ” make it all up” as they are saying about me to all of our mutual sober friends. The term they use for me is ” psycho b#$%^h” . I am still wrestling with this whole bizarre scenario. He treated me like the most special person in the world around his kids and family, but apparently thought differently about me to his friends. I spoke with him recently and all he could say was ‘ You DID this to me !!” I said how would you have felt if this happened to one of your daughters? his reply’ I would kill the person. I said then why did you let it happen to me?? And he said ” It’s always about you !!’ And I wound up apologizing. Please help !!

  63. I feel a strong urge to reach out to my toxic person. I don’t understand them, & I have so many questions, but I feel like it would just be a waste of time. They’re so evasive… should I just save these questions for my therapist?

  64. Hello,
    I have been in a relationship with my now ex for 8 years. We have a cycle of behavior. I break up with him, he goes on dating sites and has sexual relations with many women, I reach out because I miss him, I compete with his dating site women to win him back, we get back together for about a year, I break up again and the cycle starts all over again. I am always the one to take the blame for the failure of the relationship although I know it is both of us that cause the break-up. He has a drinking problem and I don’t feel like he has any value on the relationship and that he takes me for granted. If I ever have any type of emotion about anything, he says that I am making him feel bad and he gets mad at me. He is the only one that is allowed to be upset or angry about anything. I am identifying my issues and working on them. I have even told my ex that I know what I do and I am working on it, but he states he does not want to be in a relationship with anyone at the moment.

  65. Jeri, this sounds like an extremely toxic situation. I sincerely hope that you reach out for the help and support for YOU, in order to release your attachment to this person and create the healthy, happy, reciprocal relationship that you deserve. All the best, Lisa Marie Bobby

  66. Toms story hits soo close to home. Doesn’t start the same nor hoping it ends the same either but I’m there. Iv found a mirrored relationship that I can’t shake. I walk on egg shells. I have to apologize for everything. And I’m always getting dumped left desperate to be back with her. Going on 3 years now. I love her. She seduces me. But always leaves me insecure and with anxiety. Her recent issue with my 11 year old , calling him a lying monster who needs therapy, then ending us and blocking me. I’m a single dad 2 kids full time. I know I should be feeling totally offended but I obsess over being Back together. I can’t shake it. Please share whatever advice you gave Tom.

  67. My wife is verbally, mentally and has been in other ways abusive to me at times. She’s been having an affair for almost a year now too. I know I need to get out but the kids will suffer and she won’t be able to do it all on her own. How am I supposed to get out of this or around and through this. It’s not just cut and dried, get out and don’t look back. I don’t think there’s a shred of hope to fix it, because she doesn’t want to except to not be alone.

  68. Hello,

    This is a great article. I guess I am wondering if I am in a toxic addicted relationship. I have been living with a man for 3 months now and in the beginning it was great, then the fits of rage and fighting began. One fit went on for 5 hours as he tore the house apart looking for his tape measure that he was sure I put somewhere or someone had stolen it. Quite scary… he found it a couple weeks later (no apology). There are a lots of theses incidents, and he with holds sex like it’s a reward for good behavior. I am not an unattractive woman by any means and he never gives me compliments and if I take extra time to look pretty he just asks where I’m going. I’m in my early 50s and I had a complete hysterectomy when I was 39 and I go into emotional ups and downs and so I have been blaming the ups and downs on my hormones. I actually think they come from his being standoffish and elusive and my feeling unwanted. He is an active addict and drinks a lot and the last time we went out he totally lost it in front of my friends and co workers. Yelled and screamed at me all the way home which is a 45 minute drive. I’m leaving a lot out, however I had to be away for a couple of days and he ignores my texts (like always) and I am trying to just be and be happy without him. Why is this so hard? I just need to know if I am in a bad situation..,

  69. Hi Dr,

    I am addicted to a person I can’t let go of, a best friend. I was addicted to her nurturing and mothering feeling she gave me after my ex husband left. Long story short, I was adopted and had sexual abuse in my past. So I am the unhealthy one. I have tried for years and we go through the cycle again and again. She made me feel whole and I’m lost without her. I’ve done years of counseling, can you recommend the best books that i can read as I still want to become healthy and able to break free. She is in no contact mode and does this quite often for months at a time and I go crazy. And advice would be welcomed.

  70. Fran, I hope that you hear this with the love and respect with which it is intended: I have no idea what’s going on with this guy and I don’t care. What is so much more important here is that it’s time for YOU to do some growth work around your relationships.

    I am hearing in your story that you may have patterns around missing red flags, you have trouble distinguishing emotionally safe people from unsafe people, you get attached to taxic people, and that you continue to try to get love and validation from people who mistreat you.

    I will not even attempt to speculate about why that is so, but I think it would be a really, really good idea for you to get involved with a really good, evidence-based therapist in your area who has experience around trauma and attachment theory. (It would be in your best interest for you to work with someone who could meet with you in person, not online).

    It sounds like you have done really important and effective work around your sobriety, and that is wonderful — all of that was likely hard won, and it’s yours to keep. And, as I’m sure you know, the work of recovery in some ways only begins once the substance use is managed. Then the true, deep work of healing can begin. You deserve that Fran. I wish you all the best on your continued journey of growth and healing. Lisa Marie Bobby

  71. David, I am glad that you found this cautionary tale. But I’m afraid that the path ahead of you goes way beyond “advice.” The process of breaking your addiction to a toxic relationship requires active work with a therapist or coach who can help you break this unhealthy attachment so that you can not just protect your children, but yourself.

    What Tom was dealing with was an addiction to an unhealthy relationship, and the process of healing is one that is very much like recovering from any other addiction. It is not an event and there is no “advice” that will help — it is a process that requires time and energy, tools, and a guide.

    The clock ran out on Tom before he was able to break his addiction fully. Since he died, and partly because of it, I wrote the book, “Exaholics: Breaking Your Addiction to an Ex Love.” There were times during my work with Tom that I felt helpless to help him break free, because I didn’t fully understand the power that being addicted to a toxic relationship can have over people. After he passed I committed to finding out more about what was happening so that I was able to more effectively help others in the future. I really, really hope that the work and the research that I did (that Tom and I did not have when we worked together) helps you: If it does, it will give meaning to Tom’s tragedy. (No pressure, haha).

    Anyway, David, I sincerely hope that you have the determination and courage to do this important work so that you can not just break free, but go on to create the happy, healthy relationship you deserve. I hope you read the book and that it helps you. For most people, reading a book is not enough though. (Like if you were an alcoholic, reading a self-help book about alcoholism is only one small part of the recovery process).

    Many people need the support of a good coach or therapist who understands the science behind relationship addiction and who can help you, step by step, through the recovery process. If you would like to do that with someone at Growing Self, you are welcome to schedule a free consultation to get the ball rolling.

    Wishing you all the best David on your journey of recovery David. I believe that Tom is out there somewhere rooting for you too! 🙂

    Lisa

  72. This sounds like a terrible situation. I am so sorry that you’re going through this. I respect the fact that you are thinking about the needs of your children and what would be best for them. They are lucky to have you. This sounds like a very complex situation with a lot of moving parts, and the best advice I can give you is to get involved in your OWN therapy or coaching so that YOU have some support right now. I’d imaging that the work ahead will involve your getting clear about what is best for you and your children, and making a solid plan to take action when the time is right. At some point, I’m guessing that it will involve working through a lot of big feelings like grief and anger too. It’s going to be a journey, and one that will be measured in months at least, and probably years. Get connected with a good therapist who can walk by your side through all the ups, downs, twists, and turns in your future. It sounds like you’re taking care of a lot of people, and you deserve to have care and support too.

    Wishing you all the best on your journey to healing,
    Lisa

  73. Yes. K, this sounds like an objectively bad situation. You might consider checking out the resources on this website: https://thehotline.org. It has resources and information about domestic violence, and support for you if you need it. From the way this is going, you might. Stay safe… Lisa

  74. I’m addicted to this dude and I know our relationship is toxic. And I act like it’s fine. Reality I’m not fine. I just don’t want him with anyone else. He controls everything of what I can or can’t say. I can’t post him. And he wants a child with me. And he says I can’t post him with the child. It’s too much. I can’t handle it.

  75. I was on and off with my ex for 9 months. I kept trying to leave him because he was an alcoholic (an angry drunk), manipulative, gaslighting and really really mean. He’d constantly accuse me of cheating or seeing other men and I’ve had to repeat myself over and over again, telling him I have never done any of those things. He’s done so many things to me that have traumatized me significantly i.e put me into a chokehold because I had slapped him for slut shaming me and then telling his friends later on that I was punching him and that he could take it, coercing me into having sex with him when I was crying, etc. I broke things off, blocked him on social media and changed my number in November, but I ended up contacting him again a month in a half later. At first, I had just wanted to talk to him to relinquish any unsettled feelings, but we hooked up, I was convinced we were gonna get back together, but he didn’t initiate any calls or messages. I noticed he wasn’t interested and then after a couple weeks he had told me he had feelings for and hooked up with someone else. So I was thinking, okay he’s officially moved on, I’ve already determined that he’s a jerk, so I’ll move on. I told him to stop calling me and he stopped for a while. But then he texted me again a couple weeks ago saying he needed to talk to me, we talked, I tried setting boundaries, he crossed those boundaries and we ended up hooking up twice. I recently found out that he got into a relationship with the girl he has feelings for and he basically cheated…I asked him what our relationship was and he had said, he doesn’t know and that I was on trial, which means he’s still trying to choI’m sorry if this is too much detail, but to sum things up, he is the hugest jerk I’ve ever met and unfortunately he’s been my very first boyfriend or “love” or lack thereof.. He’s got me wrapped around his finger and for some odd reason, I can’t let him go. It’s hard for me to ignore his calls..

  76. What about the wife’s side in this? My now ex husband has become addicted to toxic relationships and cheated twice now. I am the wife sitting at home in this scenario. How do I get past all those feeings of insecurity, betrayal, not enough, etc when he keeps making promises and then going back to the addiction. He cheated on the new girl too… so really he’s kind of like the example on the podcast.

  77. I have been in a relationship for 1.5 years under false pretenses that I had filed for divorce. Which I had not but was madly in love with this partner. She found out through a message to me which was, from the way written, an attempt to get back together. Caught in a web of lies and only because I did not want to lose my new love I continued to try to lie to get out of it only making it worse. Now I cannot let my new partner go but she is done with the lies and inability to trust me. While my wife wants to forgive me and get back together. I truly want my new partner to be with me but she is beyond reluctant as I lied to her about my previous relationship and multiple other items to continue the facade.,

  78. Jim, given what you’re describing, I wonder if the best course of action may be for you to not be in any relationship with anyone until you get yourself figured out and get to a place where you can be a reliable, trustworthy partner. Wishing you all the best….. Lisa

  79. I have been in a relationship with someone for about a year who has some serious emotional baggage, which he seems unable to even start to deal with. I’ve been dumped several times over that year, and kept being drawn back in because I believed the way he was treating me was in some way forgivable, a result of him not being able to cope with the emotional turmoil he was experiencing. I was kept a secret from his family due to some of this baggage, with my stuff I left at his house packed up when they were coming over. So I’d be dumped but as soon as I put some distance between us he’d appear again with a phone call or text, asking me to come over and we’d start again, only for him to disappear again shortly after. I just feel like I’ve been kept on a piece of elastic. I was increasingly being blamed, I was “making things impossible” and stressing him out, if I even dared to discuss how the problems he was experiencing could be overcome. True you shouldn’t try to fix people but I was doing it for me too, as it was effecting my life. Now I find myself being sent a text from him saying “we are over, i’m not going back’, as if I am the only one that has been pursuing this relationship.

  80. What a terrible situation for you to have been in. You know, I think it’s really common for people trapped in a toxic relationship to go around and around a few times until they can begin to see the toxic relationship patterns they’ve been dealing with. I can understand how it’s enraging to now be manipulated and made out to be the pursuer, but I would encourage you to not take the bait and argue back. In genuinely toxic relationships, that type of emotional game-playing and the need to “defend yourself” is actually part of what can keep you trapped in this dynamic. Better to just block this person and remove their ability to communicate with you at all, ever again. That will keep you from being baited and tormented, so that you can get far, far away from all this. Did you check out the “Leaving a Toxic Relationship” podcast yet? I hope you listen to it! Wishing you all the best, Dr. Lisa

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